Magnetic Refrigerators
Magnetic Refrigerators
Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric have teamed up to create a revolutionary new type of refrigerator that uses magnets to create cold, also known as the magnetocaloric effect (lowering or raising the temperature of the material by changing the magnetic field).
Ultra-Efficient Heat Pumps
Ultra-Efficient Heat Pumps
The Building Technologies Office is ushering in the next generation of heat pump systems, which warm and cool your home by moving heat from one space to another. A fuel-fired, multi-function residential heat pump that can reduce primary energy consumption by 30 percent.
Clothes Dryers
Clothes Dryers
The same concept behind heat pump technologies that keep your home comfortable can also be used for another important application: drying your clothes. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric are developing a new type of clothes dryer that uses a heat pump cycle to generate hot air needed for drying.
Smarter, More Connected Homes
Smarter, More Connected Homes
We live in an increasingly connected world -- the same is true for our homes. New electronic devices and appliances can now be linked to the Internet to provide real-time data that makes it easier to understand and lower energy use.
Next-Gen Insulation
Next-Gen Insulation
Insulation is one of the most important ways to reduce your home heating and cooling costs. The Industrial Science & Technology Network is developing new foam insulation made with environmentally friendly and advanced composite materials that ensure heat doesn’t escape from the attic, walls and other areas of the home during cold winter months.
Advanced Window Controls
Advanced Window Controls
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Pella Windows are working on new highly insulated windows that use sensors and microprocessors to automatically adjust shading based on the amount of available sunlight and the time of day to ensure proper lighting and comfort, saving consumers energy and money.
Reflective Roofing Materials
Reflective Roofing Materials
Cool roofs coated with materials containing specialized pigments reflect sunlight and absorb less heat than standard roofs. Expect these types of roof systems to get even “cooler” due to new fluorescent pigments developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and PPG Industries that can reflect nearly four times the amount of sunlight of standard pigments.

Energy-Saving Solutions

From heating and cooling to electronics and appliances, it takes a lot of energy to power our daily lives. Our homes use 37 percent more energy today than they did in 1980. But without energy efficiency -- through technology innovation and federal energy conservation standards -- this number would be a lot higher. In fact, even though our total energy use has grown, our energy use per household is down about 10 percent, despite that our homes are larger and contain more devices.

Save Energy Systems

10 August 2020

How to Grow Herbs Indoors

During the COVID pandemic, bare shelves and picked-over products became the visual reminder that nothing was normal or typical, and some shoppers simply purchased whatever meats, canned goods, and other essentials were available. For some, though, a home garden, backyard...

The post How to Grow Herbs Indoors appeared first on HomeSelfe.


During the COVID pandemic, bare shelves and picked-over products became the visual reminder that nothing was normal or typical, and some shoppers simply purchased whatever meats, canned goods, and other essentials were available. For some, though, a home garden, backyard...

The post How to Grow Herbs Indoors appeared first on HomeSelfe.

During the COVID pandemic, bare shelves and picked-over products became the visual reminder that nothing was normal or typical, and some shoppers simply purchased whatever meats, canned goods, and other essentials were available.

For some, though, a home garden, backyard chickens, or flourishing fruit trees might have provided easy access to foods that were lacking on store shelves. Even during typical times, though, embracing self-sufficiency can save you money at the store…especially when demand soars over supply. Herbs are one of the easiest gardens to grow, and you don’t even need a backyard! Here’s how to grow herbs indoors!

What Herbs Grow Best Indoors?

Before you start picking out cute pots are planters for your seeds, you need to know what herbs grow best indoors. Some plants require lots of sunlight, others don’t need much light at all. Some rooms of your home may be more—or less—ideal for plant life. When you’re looking to begin an indoor herb garden, Gardeners.com recommends choosing these herb varieties:

  • Basil
  • Bay laurel
  • Chives
  • Mint
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
How to Grow Herbs Indoors

What Do I Need to Grow Herbs Indoors?

Sun, water, and soil are the key ingredients for happy plants. However, how much water and sun each plant requires is dependent on the variety. Oregano, parsley, rosemary, and mint love strong light (or, in some cases, moderate light). Other herbs—like basil–need sunny placement, too.

For plants that need strong sunny rays, locate your indoor garden in a room where sunlight is optimal. If there isn’t a place where the sun will shine directly on plants that need the light, then you might opt for a grow light.

Watering needs may be unique to each herb; research all plants so you know how much water to provide and how frequently you need to provide it. Watering too much or not enough could cause your plants to wilt or die. The benefit of an indoor garden, though, is that you may save money on watering, as you won’t be dependent on using sprinklers (which can get costly!).

How Do You Grow Herbs Indoor All-Year Round?

Our homes remain a fairly consistent temperature throughout the year, although this depends on the area. During the winter, the thermostat may drop to 68 degrees, but in the summer our indoor temps may be adjusted closer to 80.

Plants thrive in different temperatures. According to Gardeners.com, “Rosemary tolerates hot, sunny, dry locations in the summer months, but prefers cooler temperatures (40 to 65 degrees F) in the winter, as long as the light is strong.” If you’re concerned about how your plants will thrive indoors, talk to a gardening expert at your local nursery.

how to grow herbs indoors

How Do I Start an Indoor Herb Garden?

You might only use certain herbs in your recipes or meals. The best way to decide on how to start an indoor herb garden is to evaluate what herbs you actually use. The smell of mint might be refreshing, but it might not be the best herb for your garden if you never plan to use it.

If you’re completely unsure what herbs are useful for certain dishes, here’s a bit of a cheat sheet for each indoor-compatible herb:

Basil

This is a favorite herb for dishes like margherita pizza (basil, tomato, and mozzarella), pesto, and, lots of pasta recipes (use it in spaghetti and lasagna), and toss it in some soups, too!

Bay Laurel

The bay leaf is dropped into many recipes for added taste and dimension. Soups and stews commonly call for bay, and Taste of Home breaks down why this little leaf is an important ingredient for these warm comfort foods.

Chives

Sour cream and chives! So good on baked potatoes and for creating the perfect dip for chips. Use chives to top soups, too!

Mint

Perfect for adding a refreshing zest to tea, topping desserts, drinks (the Mint Julep) and more!

Oregano

Most of us add oregano to pasta sauces to add flavor, but MasterClass states that this herb also is used in olive oil dishes, too.

Parsley

This herb is more than just that cute garnish to make a dish look pretty and finished. The Cooking Channel notes that this herb has a “slightly peppery” flavor and offers a list of recipes that call for pops of parsley.

Rosemary

Add rosemary to pot roasts, chicken, potatoes and more. The herb has a unique and distinct flavor that can elevate even basic dishes. Just don’t add too much…a little does go a long way!

Thyme

You can add thyme to many dishes, per Taste of Home, which includes a list of 30 recipes that call for thyme. Meats, veggies and even fruit can be elevated with a little thyme!

Growing an indoor garden allows you to embrace self-sufficiency and rely less on the availability of store offered products (which may still be in low supply). Herbs may be an easy option for those who are new to gardening. Many herb varieties can be grown indoors, but it’s important to research water, soil and sunlight needs to ensure that they thrive…and survive. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a gardening expert at your local nursery if you have questions about starting your garden or need help finding the right supplies.

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